Expedition to the Walikale Jungle

At the request of Turner Prize-winning artist Steve McQueen, in September 2006 gorilla guide. Greg Cummings led an expedition into the forests of the Walikale Region of DR Congo, as part of a film McQueen was making.  The expedition party – which included the film crew, 20 local porters, a chef, and a priest – set out from Walikale Town in the back of a pick-up, but after some 12 kilometers the road ceased to exist, whereupon they proceeded on foot. It took them three days, walking an average of 10 kilometers a day to reach the mining village in the middle of the jungle, where the crew shot just 20 minutes of 35 mm footage. They returned via chartered plane, through Goma, and the expedition was deemed a complete success.

You can take the same expedition on Google Earth by downloading the place mark here. Launch your software, then click the play button on your ‘Places’ panel to run the expedition.

Who is Greg Cummings?

He is the Expert Gorilla Guide. Greg Cummings is an award-winning conservationist, author, and one of the most experienced gorilla safari hands in Africa. He has been leading tours to meet your hairy mountain cousins for nearly two decades now, and knows his way around most of their habitats, including Virunga, Bwindi, Kahuzi Biega, Walikale, Mt. Tshiaberimu, Cross River and Moukalaba Doudou.

Since he learned to walk, Greg Cummings has been stomping the Rift Valley: first as a UN brat, then variously as a free-lance journalist, relief worker, wildlife conservationists, safari guide, UN consultant, bar manager, and last but not least, published author. He is endlessly entertained by the people, culture and stories from the region of the Rift, and wonders if there’s any subject about which he hasn’t formed some opinion.

Twin Gorillas Born in Rwanda

The video (above), filmed by Gorilla Doctor Jan Ramer, shows Mountain gorilla Kabatwa, mother of new twin boys in Hirwa gorilla group. She is famished after giving birth and indulges in a much needed meal. Twins are rare in the Mountain gorilla population and only 5 sets have been recorded in history.